Archive for the ‘Meteor Shower’ Category

Meteorite hits Russian Urals: Fireball explosion wreaks havoc.

Friday, February 15th, 2013

This morning in central Russia they awoke to a meteorite, that injured several people and damage to property.
The following youtube video is a collection of videos from several perspectives some videos include breaking glass from sonic booms, and falling debris from the meteorite.
Since the video is from Russia, I’am not sure what anyone is saying.

NASA / JPL What’s Up for December 2012?

Sunday, December 16th, 2012

Source – NASA /JPL Solar System Exploration:

What’s Up for December? Starry fireworks end the year with a bang

NASA a live video/audio feed of the Perseid shower

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Source – NASA Chat: Stay ‘Up All Night’ to Watch the Perseids:

A live video/audio feed of the Perseid shower is embedded below. The camera is mounted at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. During daylight, you’ll see a dark gray box — the camera is light-activated and will turn on at dusk. At night you’ll see white points, or stars, on a black background.



Live stream by Ustream

About the Perseids

The Perseids have been observed for at least 2,000 years and are associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle, which orbits the sun once every 133 years. Each year in August, the Earth passes through a cloud of the comet’s debris. These bits of ice and dust — most over 1,000 years old — burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere to create one of the best meteor showers of the year. The Perseids can be seen all over the sky, but the best viewing opportunities will be across the northern hemisphere. Those with sharp eyes will see that the meteors radiate from the direction of the constellation Perseus.

More About the Chat Experts

Bill Cooke
Danielle Moser
Rhiannon Blaauw

Janet Anderson, 256-544-0034
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
Janet.L.Anderson@nasa.gov

ScienceCasts: A Wonderful Night in April

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

Source – Science@NASA:

If you have to chose just one night in April to go out and look at the stars, NASA scientists say it should be April 21st. This week’s ScienceCast explains what makes that one night so special.

The Lyrid meteor Shower on the night of 21st/22nd April

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

The Lyrid Meteor Shower – so called as the radiant (from where the meteor trails seem to radiate from) lies in the constellation Lyra peaks in the early morning of the 22nd April and is a reliable, though not spectacular, shower with perhaps up to 15 meteors seen per hour. Observations of the Lyrid meteors have been made for at least 2,600 years! Happily, this year the peak of activity is only one day after the new moon so there will be no moonlight to hinder our observations should it be clear. Observations made after 1 am are expected to be the most productive. The dust particles that cause the shower have been released by the comet Thatcher, discovered in 1861. Occasionally we pass through a dense clump of particles as happened in 1982 when over 90 meteors were seen per hour. So its worth waking up to have a look if around 1-2 am should it be expected to be clear. Look to the East as shown in the chart.


The Radiant of the Lyrid meteor Shower
Stellarium/IM
Click On Image for larger Picture

Reprinted with the permission of

Ian Morison
Gresham Professor of Astronomy
http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/astronomy/nightsky/

Professor Ian Morison Lectures can be viewed at
http://fora.tv/search_video?q=Morison

Weekend Meteor Shower Oct. 20, 2011:

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Source – NASA Science News:

A map of the morning sky on Saturday, Oct. 22nd at 5:30 a.m. local time, viewed facing southeast.
A map of the morning sky on Saturday, Oct. 22nd at 5:30 a.m. local time, viewed facing southeast.

Weekend Meteor Shower Oct. 20, 2011: Earth is about to pass through a stream of debris from Halley’s comet, source of the annual Orionid meteor shower. Forecasters expect more than 15 meteors per hour to fly across the sky on Saturday morning, Oct. 22nd, when the shower peaks.

Orionids are most easily seen during the dark hours before sunrise. Twilight Orionids, however, are the most beautiful of all. “Although this isn’t the biggest meteor shower of the year, it’s definitely worth waking up for,” says Bill Cooke of the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office. “The setting is dynamite.”

Orionids are framed by some of the brightest and most beautiful constellations in the night sky. The meteors emerge from mighty Orion, the shower’s glittering namesake. From there they streak through Taurus the Bull, the twins of Gemini, Leo the Lion, and Canis Major–home to Sirius, the most brilliant star of all.

This year, the Moon and Mars are part of the show. They’ll form two vertices of a celestial triangle in the eastern sky on Saturday morning while the shower is most active; Regulus is the third vertex. Blue Regulus and red Mars are both approximately of 1st magnitude, so they are easy to see alongside the 35% crescent Moon. Many Orionids will be diving through the triangle in the hours before dawn.

Cooke’s team at the Meteoroid Environment Office will be watching for Orionids that actually hit the Moon.

Cometary debris streams like Halley’s are so wide, the whole Earth-Moon system fits inside. So when there is a meteor shower on Earth, there’s usually one on the Moon, too. Unlike Earth, however, the Moon has no atmosphere to intercept meteoroids. Pieces of debris fall all the way to the surface and explode where they hit. Flashes of light caused by thermal heating of lunar rocks and moondust are so bright, they can sometimes be seen through backyard-class telescopes.

“Since we began our monitoring program in 2005, our group has detected more than 250 lunar meteors,” says Cooke. “Some explode with energies exceeding hundreds of pounds of TNT.”

So far, they’ve seen 15 Orionids hitting the Moon–“two in 2007, four in 2008, and nine in 2009,” recalls Cooke. This year they hope to add to the haul. About 25% of the Moon’s dark terrain will be exposed to Halley’s debris stream, giving the team millions of square miles to scan for explosions.

Watching meteoroids hit the Moon is a good way to learn about the structure of comet debris streams and the energy of the particles therein. It also allows Cooke and colleagues to calculate risk factors for astronauts who, someday, will walk on the lunar surface again.

“Going outside to watch the Orionids might not be a good idea for a moonwalker,” says Cooke.

But it is a good idea for the rest of us. Set your alarm for a few hours before dawn on Saturday morning and enjoy the show.

Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA