Posts Tagged ‘Meteor Shower’

Meteorite hits Russian Urals: Fireball explosion wreaks havoc.

Friday, February 15th, 2013

This morning in central Russia they awoke to a meteorite, that injured several people and damage to property.
The following youtube video is a collection of videos from several perspectives some videos include breaking glass from sonic booms, and falling debris from the meteorite.
Since the video is from Russia, I’am not sure what anyone is saying.

NASA / JPL What’s Up for December 2012?

Sunday, December 16th, 2012

Source – NASA /JPL Solar System Exploration:

What’s Up for December? Starry fireworks end the year with a bang

NASA / What’s Up for October 2012

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Source – NASA /JPL Solar System Exploration:

Be on the lookout for two of the brightest objects in the asteroid belt, Ceres and Vesta near Jupiter plus two meteor showers!

NASA a live video/audio feed of the Perseid shower

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

Source – NASA Chat: Stay ‘Up All Night’ to Watch the Perseids:

A live video/audio feed of the Perseid shower is embedded below. The camera is mounted at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. During daylight, you’ll see a dark gray box — the camera is light-activated and will turn on at dusk. At night you’ll see white points, or stars, on a black background.



Live stream by Ustream

About the Perseids

The Perseids have been observed for at least 2,000 years and are associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle, which orbits the sun once every 133 years. Each year in August, the Earth passes through a cloud of the comet’s debris. These bits of ice and dust — most over 1,000 years old — burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere to create one of the best meteor showers of the year. The Perseids can be seen all over the sky, but the best viewing opportunities will be across the northern hemisphere. Those with sharp eyes will see that the meteors radiate from the direction of the constellation Perseus.

More About the Chat Experts

Bill Cooke
Danielle Moser
Rhiannon Blaauw

Janet Anderson, 256-544-0034
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
Janet.L.Anderson@nasa.gov

The Lyrid meteor Shower on the night of 21st/22nd April

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

The Lyrid Meteor Shower – so called as the radiant (from where the meteor trails seem to radiate from) lies in the constellation Lyra peaks in the early morning of the 22nd April and is a reliable, though not spectacular, shower with perhaps up to 15 meteors seen per hour. Observations of the Lyrid meteors have been made for at least 2,600 years! Happily, this year the peak of activity is only one day after the new moon so there will be no moonlight to hinder our observations should it be clear. Observations made after 1 am are expected to be the most productive. The dust particles that cause the shower have been released by the comet Thatcher, discovered in 1861. Occasionally we pass through a dense clump of particles as happened in 1982 when over 90 meteors were seen per hour. So its worth waking up to have a look if around 1-2 am should it be expected to be clear. Look to the East as shown in the chart.


The Radiant of the Lyrid meteor Shower
Stellarium/IM
Click On Image for larger Picture

Reprinted with the permission of

Ian Morison
Gresham Professor of Astronomy
http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/astronomy/nightsky/

Professor Ian Morison Lectures can be viewed at
http://fora.tv/search_video?q=Morison

Weekend Meteor Shower Oct. 20, 2011:

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Source – NASA Science News:

A map of the morning sky on Saturday, Oct. 22nd at 5:30 a.m. local time, viewed facing southeast.
A map of the morning sky on Saturday, Oct. 22nd at 5:30 a.m. local time, viewed facing southeast.

Weekend Meteor Shower Oct. 20, 2011: Earth is about to pass through a stream of debris from Halley’s comet, source of the annual Orionid meteor shower. Forecasters expect more than 15 meteors per hour to fly across the sky on Saturday morning, Oct. 22nd, when the shower peaks.

Orionids are most easily seen during the dark hours before sunrise. Twilight Orionids, however, are the most beautiful of all. “Although this isn’t the biggest meteor shower of the year, it’s definitely worth waking up for,” says Bill Cooke of the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office. “The setting is dynamite.”

Orionids are framed by some of the brightest and most beautiful constellations in the night sky. The meteors emerge from mighty Orion, the shower’s glittering namesake. From there they streak through Taurus the Bull, the twins of Gemini, Leo the Lion, and Canis Major–home to Sirius, the most brilliant star of all.

This year, the Moon and Mars are part of the show. They’ll form two vertices of a celestial triangle in the eastern sky on Saturday morning while the shower is most active; Regulus is the third vertex. Blue Regulus and red Mars are both approximately of 1st magnitude, so they are easy to see alongside the 35% crescent Moon. Many Orionids will be diving through the triangle in the hours before dawn.

Cooke’s team at the Meteoroid Environment Office will be watching for Orionids that actually hit the Moon.

Cometary debris streams like Halley’s are so wide, the whole Earth-Moon system fits inside. So when there is a meteor shower on Earth, there’s usually one on the Moon, too. Unlike Earth, however, the Moon has no atmosphere to intercept meteoroids. Pieces of debris fall all the way to the surface and explode where they hit. Flashes of light caused by thermal heating of lunar rocks and moondust are so bright, they can sometimes be seen through backyard-class telescopes.

“Since we began our monitoring program in 2005, our group has detected more than 250 lunar meteors,” says Cooke. “Some explode with energies exceeding hundreds of pounds of TNT.”

So far, they’ve seen 15 Orionids hitting the Moon–“two in 2007, four in 2008, and nine in 2009,” recalls Cooke. This year they hope to add to the haul. About 25% of the Moon’s dark terrain will be exposed to Halley’s debris stream, giving the team millions of square miles to scan for explosions.

Watching meteoroids hit the Moon is a good way to learn about the structure of comet debris streams and the energy of the particles therein. It also allows Cooke and colleagues to calculate risk factors for astronauts who, someday, will walk on the lunar surface again.

“Going outside to watch the Orionids might not be a good idea for a moonwalker,” says Cooke.

But it is a good idea for the rest of us. Set your alarm for a few hours before dawn on Saturday morning and enjoy the show.

Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA

ORIONID METEOR SHOWER:

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Source – Space Weather News for Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2010: http://spaceweather.com

ORIONID METEOR SHOWER: Earth is entering a broad stream of debris from Halley’s Comet, and this is causing the annual Orionid meteor shower. “The best time to look is during the hours before dawn on Thursday, Oct. 21st, and again on Friday, Oct 22nd,” advises Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office. “Unfortunately, we have a bright Moon this year. Even so, I’d expect some bright Orionids to shine through the moonlight.” An all-sky camera at the University of Western Ontario recorded this early Orionid fireball on Oct. 18th:
Orionid meteors stream from the elbow of Orion the Hunter: sky map. Because the shower’s radiant point is close to the celestial equator, sky watchers in both hemispheres can enjoy the show. Moonlit meteor rates will probably be around a dozen per hour.
Radar rates could be much higher. The US Air Force Space Surveillance Radar in Texas is scanning the skies for satellites, space junk, and meteoroids. When an Orionid passes overhead–ping!–there is an echo. Moonlight does not interfere with this method of meteor observing, so it’s perfect for this year’s Orionids. Tune into Spaceweather Radio for live echoes.

How to See the Best Meteor Showers of the Year: Tools, Tips and ‘Save the Dates’

Friday, August 13th, 2010

Source – JPL NASA August 06, 2010: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally posted April 21, 2010, and updated Aug. 6, 2010

There are several major meteor showers to enjoy every year at various times, with some more active than others. For example, April’s Lyrids are expected to produce about 15 meteors an hour at their peak for observers viewing in good conditions. Now, if you put the same observer in the same good conditions during a higher-rate shower like August’s Perseids or December’s Geminids, that person could witness up to 80 meteors an hour during peak activity.

Whether you’re watching from a downtown area or the dark countryside, here are some tips to help you enjoy these celestial shows of shooting stars. Those streaks of light are really caused by tiny specks of comet-stuff hitting Earth’s atmosphere at very high speed and disintegrating in flashes of light.

First a word about the moon – it is not the meteor watcher’s friend. Light reflecting off a bright moon can be just as detrimental to good meteor viewing as those bright lights of the big city. There is nothing you can do except howl at the moon, so you’ll have to put up with it or wait until the next favorable shower. However, even though the 2010 Perseids and Geminids share the night sky with the moon, they are still expected to produce more visible meteor activity than other major showers that don’t have an interfering moon.

The best thing you can do to maximize the number of meteors you’ll see is to get as far away from urban light pollution as possible and find a location with a clear, unclouded view of the night sky. If you enjoy camping, try planning a trip that coincides with dates of one of the meteor showers listed below. Once you get to your viewing location, search for the darkest patch of sky you can find, as meteors can appear anywhere overhead. The meteors will always travel in a path away from the constellation for which the shower is named. This apparent point of origin is called the “radiant.” For example, meteors during a Leonid meteor shower will appear to originate from the constellation Leo. (Note: the constellation only serves as a helpful guide in the night’s sky. The constellation is not the actual source of the meteors. For an overview of what causes meteor showers click on Meteor Showers: Shooting for Shooting Stars)

Whether viewing from your front porch or a mountaintop, be sure to dress for success. This means clothing appropriate for cold overnight temperatures, which might include mittens or gloves, and blankets. This will enable you to settle in without having to abandon the meteor-watching because your fingers are starting to turn colors.

Next, bring something comfortable on which to sit or lie down. While Mother Nature can put on a magnificent celestial display, meteor showers rarely approach anything on the scale of a July 4th fireworks show. Plan to be patient and watch for at least half an hour. A reclining chair or ground pad will make it far more comfortable to keep your gaze on the night sky.

Lastly, put away the telescope or binoculars. Using either reduces the amount of sky you can see at one time, lowering the odds that you’ll see anything but darkness. Instead, let your eyes hang loose and don’t look in any one specific spot. Relaxed eyes will quickly zone in on any movement up above, and you’ll be able to spot more meteors. Avoid looking at your cell phone or any other light. Both destroy night vision. If you have to look at something on Earth, use a red light. Some flashlights have handy interchangeable filters. If you don’t have one of those, you can always paint the clear filter with red fingernail polish.

The meteor showers listed below will provide casual meteor observers with the most bang for their buck. They are the easiest to observe and most active. All these showers are best enjoyed in the hours after midnight. Be sure to also check the “Related Links” box for additional information, and for tools to help you determine how many meteors may be visible from your part of the world.

Major Meteor Showers (2010-2011)

Delta Aquarids
Comet of Origin: unknown
Radiant: constellation Aquarius
Active: July 14-Aug. 18, 2010
Peak Activity: No definite peak, but nights surrounding July 30 were predicted to be the best
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 15 meteors per hour (Northern Hemisphere).
Time of Optimal Viewing: An hour or two before dawn. Meteor watchers in the Southern Hemisphere and in the Northern Hemisphere’s tropical latitudes enjoy the best views.
Meteor Velocity: 42 kilometers per second (26 miles per second)

Perseids
Comet of Origin: 109P/Swift-Tuttle
Radiant: constellation Perseus
Active: Perseids begin to rise early August.
Peak Activity: Aug. 12-13, 2010
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 50 meteors per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: Crescent moon will set early in the evening, allowing for dark skies all the way up until peak viewing just before dawn
Meteor Velocity: 61 kilometers (38 miles) per second
Note: The Perseid meteor shower is one of the most consistent performers and considered by many as 2010’s best shower. The meteors they produce are among the brightest of all meteor showers.

Orionids
Comet of Origin: 1P/Halley
Radiant: Just to the north of constellation Orion’s bright star Betelgeuse
Active: Oct. 4-Nov. 14, 2010
Peak Activity: Night of Oct. 22, but the light reflecting off an almost-full moon makes 2010 a less-than-spectacular year for one of Mother Nature’s most spectacular showers.
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 15 meteors per hour, if the sky is dark
Time of Optimal Viewing: An hour or two before dawn
Meteor Velocity: 68 kilometers (42 miles) per second
Note: With the second-fastest entry velocity of the annual meteor showers, meteors from the Orionids produce yellow and green colors and have been known to produce an odd fireball from time to time.

Leonids
Comet of Origin: 55P/Tempel-Tuttle
Radiant: constellation Leo
Active: Nov. 7-28, 2010
Peak Activity: Night of Nov. 17-18, 2010
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 15 per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: A half-full moon sets after midnight, allowing for a dark sky. Best viewing time will be just before dawn.
Meteor Velocity: 71 kilometers (44 miles) per second
Note: The Leonids have not only produced some of the best meteor showers in history, but they have sometimes achieved the status of meteor storm. During a Leonid meteor storm, many thousands of meteors per hour can shoot across the sky. Scientists believe these storms recur in cycles of about 33 years, though the reason is unknown. The last documented Leonid meteor storm occurred in 2002.

Geminids
Comet of Origin: 3200 Phaethon
Radiant: constellation Gemini
Active: Dec. 4-16, 2010
Peak Activity: Night of Dec 13-14, 2010
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 50 meteors per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: 2 a.m.
Meteor Velocity: 35 kilometers (22 miles) per second
Note: Generally, the Geminids or August’s Perseids provide the best meteor shower show of the year. Geminids are usually considered the best opportunity for younger viewers because the show gets going around 9 or 10 p.m. Unfortunately the moon does not set until after midnight this year, making for the possibility of drooping eyelids from the pre-teen set.

Quadrantids
Comet of Origin: 2003 EH1
Radiant: constellation Quadrant Murales
Active: Dec. 28, 2010-Jan. 12, 2011
Peak Activity: Jan. 3-4, 2011
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 40 meteors per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: 2:30 a.m. to dawn
Meteor Velocity: 41 kilometers (25.5 miles) per second
Note: The alternate name for the Quadrantids is the Bootids. Constellation Quadrant Murales is now defunct, and the meteors appear to radiate from the modern constellation Bootes. Since the show is usually only a few hours long and often obscured by winter weather, it doesn’t have the same celebrated status as the Geminids or Perseids.

Lyrids
Comet of Origin: C/1861 G1 Thatcher
Radiant: constellation Lyra
Active: April 16-25, 2011
Peak Activity: April 21-22, 2011
Peak Activity Meteor Count: 18-20 meteors per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: 11 p.m.-dawn
Meteor Velocity: Lyrid meteors hit the atmosphere at a moderate speed of 48 kilometers (30 miles) per second. They often produce luminous dust trains observable for several seconds.
Note: Light from the waning gibbous moon will degrade viewing

Eta Aquarids
Comet of Origin: 1P Halley
Radiant: constellation Aquarius
Active: April 19-May 28, 2011
Peak Activity: Early morning May 5-7, 2011
Peak Activity Meteor Count: Approximately 20 meteors per hour
Time of Optimal Viewing: 3:30-5 a.m.
Meteor Velocity: 66 kilometers (44 miles) per second

PERSEID METEOR UPDATE:

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Source – Space Weather News for August 10, 2010: http://spaceweather.com

PERSEID METEOR UPDATE: Earth is entering the debris stream of comet Swift-Tuttle and this is causing the annual Perseid meteor shower. According to the International Meteor Organization, observers are now counting as many as 25 meteors Perseids per hour during the dark hours before dawn. It’s going to get even better: The shower is expected to peak on August 12th with rates as high as 100 per hour. Stay tuned for updates. [live meteor radar] [2010 meteor counts] [Bill Cooke’s Perseid Twitter Feed]

Strong Leonid Meteor Shower Peaks Tuesday

Monday, November 16th, 2009

 

 

 

Strong Leonid Meteor Shower Peaks Tuesday.

(Nov. 16) — One of the best annual meteor showers will peak in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday, and for some skywatchers the show could be quite impressive.
The best seats are in Asia, but North American observers should be treated to an above average performance of the Leonid meteor shower, weather permitting. The trick for all observers is to head outside in the wee hours of the morning – between 1 a.m. and dawn – regardless where you live.